Cuyahoga Valley National Park–Hale Farm and Howe Meadow

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Cuyahoga Valley NP–Hale Farm and Howe Meadow
Coordinates: 41.1935694, -81.5914417
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Photo by Susan Carpenter
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About Hale Farm and Howe Meadow
At the Cuyahoga Valley’s southwestern edge sits an impressive three-story red brick house surrounded by 140 acres of fields, gardens, and woods. Familiar to many school children, it is a now popular regional attraction that overlooks a recreated historical village.

Despite the building’s grandeur, Hale Farm began like any other farm: with hard work. In 1810, farmer Jonathan Hale arrived in Bath to begin a new life on the Western Reserve. For over one hundred years, generations of the Hale family worked and managed their land. In the early 20th century, the farm passed to Jonathan’s grandson, C.O. Hale, a kind and ambitious man who hired local families as farm laborers. Part of a newer trend in “gentleman farming,” C.O. Hale oversaw the work on his property and earned additional income by entertaining friends and tourists.

During the 1920s and 30s, the Wilson family worked for C.O. Hale, clearing land, plowing fields, baling hay, and making maple syrup. Sweating under the summer sun, they planted and harvested vegetables and grains. During the chill of winter, parents found additional employment and children went to school after milking the cows in Mr. Hale’s barn.

In the 1930s, Clara Belle Ritchie, the great-granddaughter of Jonathan Hale, inherited the farm, supervised the initial restoration work, and then donated the property to the Western Reserve Historical Society. Today, visitors can experience an outdoor living history museum at Hale Farm & Village .
From Hale Farm and Howe Meadow webpage

About Cuyahoga Valley National Park
Though a short distance from the urban areas of Cleveland and Akron, Cuyahoga Valley National Park seems worlds away. The park is a refuge for native plants and wildlife and provides routes of discovery for visitors. The winding Cuyahoga River gives way to deep forests, rolling hills, and open farmlands. Walk or ride the Towpath Trail to follow the historic route of the Ohio & Erie Canal.
From Cuyahoga Valley National Park website

Warning: All areas of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park are prone to deer ticks from the early spring until late fall, so prepare accordingly before birding.

Restrooms are available at Hale Farm when open (June – August, Wednesday through Sunday, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm; September & October, Saturday & Sunday, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm). Restrooms at locations identified on Cuyahoga Valley National Park map. Most areas have non-flush toilets; there are flush toilets available at the Pine Hollow parking lot on Quick Road and the Virginia Kendall Lake lodge building.