What’s New–Current

What’s New in Birding in Ohio

There are 3883 eBird hotspots in Ohio.

New eBird Hotspots

Scioto River Dublin Road Parking
Photo by Tim Reid

Franklin County
Scioto River Dublin Road Parking
Thanks to Tim Reid for suggesting this hotspot in Columbus and for providing photos and a description of the site.

Lucas County
Hecklinger Pond
Thanks to Paul Jacyk for suggesting this hotspot in Toledo and for providing photos of the pond.

Summit County
Cuyahoga Valley National Park–West Hines Hill Road Wetlands and Meadow
West Hines Hill Road Wetlands and Meadow is a reclaimed salvage yard and waste disposal facility on West Hines Hill Road.

Washington County
Buckeye Park
Thanks to Daniel Jonas for suggesting this hotspot in Marietta.West Hines Hill Road 

Updates

Lucas County
Glass City Metropark
Thanks to Paul Jacyk for providing photos of the first phase of development in this new metropark in Toledo.

Mahoning County
Salt Springs Road Mahoning River View
Mill Creek Park–Glacier Falls
Thanks to Bettyann Nagy for providing photos of these hotspots.

Photo by Paul Jacyk

What’s New–February 27, 2021

What’s New in Birding in Ohio

There are 3879 eBird hotspots in Ohio.

New eBird Hotspots

Northwood Walking Trail

Photo by Derrick Hill
Guernsey County
Northwood Walking Trail
Thanks to Derrick Hill for suggesting this hotspot in Cambridge and for providing a photo and description of the trail. The Northwood Walking Trail, .5 mile, crosses Wills Creek and connects to Northwood Cemetery. Parking is available on Wills Creek Valley Drive.

Holmes County
stakeout Black-headed Grosbeak, 2690 Township Rd. 66, Killbuck (2021)
There is a Black-headed Grosbeak coming to a Holmes County feeder. It has been present for approximately 4 weeks according to the homeowners Allen and Ada Raber who knew they had a grosbeak but just recently told Joshua Yoder who went and confirmed the species and spoke with the homeowners about the possibility of allowing the many visitors that would love to see this bird. Allen is most welcoming of visitors but there are some key logistics to follow to make it work well so please read and follow very carefully if you try for this bird. The address is 2690 Township Road 66, Killbuck. This is an extremely quiet narrow dirt road but there is a small running business at the house and deliveries may be made there so all of the parking is to be along the east side of the road, south of the house. Parking will need to be from the green gate and extending south from there. During peak visitation, some will need to park south back to the curve in the road and beyond to find places wide enough to pull off the east side of the road and still allow traffic to pass. It is of course crucial to not block the road and allow even small trucks to pass. Viewing will happen from the road viewing the feeder on the south side of the house. The land west of the road opposite the house is owned by someone that will not tolerate anyone on his land so do not step off the west side of the road near the house. It will be in everyone’s best interest if folks are as still and quiet as possible as you wait on the road as the bird seems pretty shy. It has often scanned the yard from the spruce on the north end of the row of White Pine by the green gate and people will be near this lookout tree so quiet and still will be essential to help the bird come to the feeder. Many thanks to the Raber’s for their hospitality and to Joshua Yoder for helping with arrangements and confirming the bird. As a thank you please sign the guestbook by the green gate and consider a donation of birdseed. Good luck!
From Kent Miller

If you have submitted a checklist for this stakeout at a personal location, please change or merge your location to the stakeout hotspot.

Lorain County
Century Park
Thanks to Debbie and Mark Raven for suggesting this hotspot on Lake Erie in Lorain.

Mahoning County
Salt Springs Road Mahoning River View
This view of the Mahoning River is on Salt Springs Road at the I-680 and OH-193 interchange. Salt Springs Road is accessible heading east on I-680. Take the Salt Springs Road exit. There is a pull off at the end of the exit ramp where the now-closed Bridge Street intersects Salt Springs Road. Park and walk to view the Mahoning River. Thanks to Bettyann Nagy for suggesting this hotspot.

About Viewing Last Reported Rare Bird Sightings

Looking for when a rare bird was last reported?

For those who wish to see when and where a rare bird sighting was last reported to eBird, visit the Birding-in-Ohio website and scroll down to the bottom of the home page. There is a table with all the rare bird sightings reported in the last 7 days in Ohio.
https://birding-in-ohio.com/#notable

You can go to that table from any page in the website using the menu bar at the top of each page:
Find a Bird -> Recent Sightings

Extra Tip
You can also view the BirdFinder gadget in a separate page in your browser:
https://www.birdfinder.net/region.php?region=US-OH
Note the code OH for Ohio in the URL. You can change that to a different state code to see a table for any state in the US.

What’s New–February 20, 2021

What’s New in Birding in Ohio

There are 3875 eBird hotspots in Ohio.

Tips for Birding in Ohio

Looking for when a rare bird was last reported?

For those who wish to see when and where a rare bird sighting was last reported to eBird, visit the Birding-in-Ohio website and scroll down to the bottom of the home page. There is a table with all the rare bird sightings reported in the last 7 days in Ohio.
https://birding-in-ohio.com/#notable

You can go to that table from any page in the website using the menu bar at the top of each page:
Find a Bird -> Recent Sightings

Extra Tip
You can also view the BirdFinder gadget in a separate page in your browser:
https://www.birdfinder.net/region.php?region=US-OH
Note the code OH for Ohio in the URL. You can change that to a different state code to see a table for any state in the US.

New eBird Hotspots

Belmont County
Barkcamp State Park–Overlook Picnic Area
Thanks to Paul Sherwood for suggesting this hotspot.

Clermont County
East Fork State Park–Tate Boat Ramp
Thanks to Brian Wulker for suggesting this additional hotspot in the East Fork State Park.

Coshocton County
Coshocton County Road 9
Newcastle Township Road 366
Sharrock Ridge Reclaimed Area
Thanks to Kent Miller for suggesting these three hotspots.

Tuscarawas River Access @ Coshocton County Road 254
Thanks to Jon Cefus for suggesting this hotspot.

Hamilton County
Pioneer Park
Thanks to Emily Pack for suggesting this hotspot in Montgomery.

Licking County
Tagg Road
The agricultural fields adjacent to Tag Road, Township Highway 48, may attract Horned Larks, Snow Buntings, and Lapland Longspurs in the winter. This road traverses privately owned properties. Please view birds from the roadside only.

Mahoning County
Mill Creek Park–Glacier Falls
Thanks to Bettyann Nagy for suggesting this additional hotpsot in Mill Creek Park.

Portage County
Jessie Smith Wildlife Preserve
Thanks to Alex Colucci for suggesting this hotspot.

Updates

Jefferson County
Rayland Marina (Jefferson Co.)
We have adjusted the name of this hotspot from “Short Creek Public Boat Ramp (Jefferson Co.)”. While at one time there was a free public boat ramp here, it is now privately operated as a marina with a fee for launching and parking. We also added information about the location of the state line in the Ohio River and the location of the Belmont County line south of this hotspot.

Focus on Birding near a State Line

Please remember that multi-state checklists are not possible in eBird. The birds you report are assigned to the state in which the hotspot is located.

Ohio is bordered by Michigan, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Kentucky, and Indiana. There are a number of Ohio eBird hotspots located near a state line. It is helpful to know where the state line is located so that the birds will be assigned to the proper state.

Birding along County, State, and Country borders

In eBird, every complete checklist should be thought of as an attempt to record everything that you can detect from where you are standing or walking. If you are standing along the banks of a river you should certainly scan the river and both of its banks. If you are along a ridgetop, you should be counting birds that you can see in all directions. However, at times there may be a geopolitical border that bisects your walking path or your field of view. Birds never have cared much about geopolitics and in many cases they freely cross borders. What is the best way to do your eBirding in cases like this?

When it comes to the position of the birder and the position of the bird, listing rules can be inconsistent. For example, the preference in Ohio is to only count birds that have demonstrably occurred within the state or county boundaries. However, most yard lists count whatever bird can be seen from your yard. eBird best practices strive to bring more consistency to lists.

Example of a location on a state line.
How to report checklists near a state or county line in Ohio

Ohio eBird reviewers ask that birders keep precise state and county lists. When you are at a location where you see birds across a state or county line, we ask that you keep two incomplete birding lists, one for each side of the border.

When keeping separate checklists for different sides of a border, please follow these rules:
+ For both checklists, the answer to “Is this a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?” must be “No“, because each list intentionally omits birds in the other geopolitical area.
+ Use your exact location for birds detected on your side of the border; create a personal location directly across from you on the opposite side of the border for the birds you detect on that side. (You can also select an appropriate hotspot for either side of the border, but only if it accurately describes your location on your side or the general vicinity of the birds on the other side.)
+ If you freely crossed back and forth across the border while birding, choose an incomplete Stationary or Traveling protocol for both checklists. If you could not freely cross the border while birding, use the “Incidental” protocol for the checklist on the inaccessible side. Do not use the Stationary or Traveling protocol for any lists plotted to counties, states, or provinces you did not actually bird within.
+ We recommend focusing on one side of the border at a time instead of trying to keep two lists at once (you will not be able to keep simultaneous lists running on eBird Mobile if you are using tracks).

eBird best practices

Continue to follow eBird best practices; submit complete checklists that are short in duration and distance.
+ At eBird, complete checklists come first. Complete checklists are an attempt to record everything you can see or hear from your location. We do not want birds left off your list simply because they were across an (often invisible) geopolitical boundary. If you do leave birds off for this reason, it is no longer a complete checklist!

When traveling somewhere, begin a new checklist every time you cross a border.
+ This ensures the expected species list on eBird Mobile is up to date, and any new birds you detect are placed in your current county, state, and country instead of the previous one.

Every bird seen or heard from your location “counts”, regardless of where the bird is.

+ A complete checklist includes birds on both sides of the border. If you are standing on the Texas side of the US-Mexico border, and you see a Lineated Woodpecker flying on the Mexico side, report it! In eBird, this observation “counts” for where you are standing (i.e., your US and Texas lists). In Ohio, we ask that you use two incomplete checklists in these circumstances so that birds are assigned to the correct state and county.

Plot your location as accurately and precisely as possible.
+ For complete checklists, always plot your checklist where you were, not where the birds were. Do not place a complete checklist anywhere you did not stand or travel during that list.
+ Your data will be summarized to a single county, state, and country based on where you plot your checklist – so be precise! Avoid using hotspots if they do not accurately represent your location for the entire checklist.

Any time you see or hear a rare bird across a border, add some notes in the Species Comments about the bird’s location.
+ From the example above: because Lineated Woodpecker does not have a confirmed record within the United States, if you see or hear one in Mexico while you are on the Texas side of the border, you would certainly be asked to provide notes about this rare observation. Write detailed comments to help other birders understand the exact location of the bird relative to your own. This is especially helpful for those that might use the data, including journals and Bird Record Committees

Geopolitical units give us a way to organize and summarize eBird observations. Any birds you report on a checklist, regardless of where or how far you travel, will be automatically assigned to a county (where applicable), state/province, and country based on where you plot your list.

In most cases, this also determines the data entry checklist and data quality filter. Your checklist can only use one eBird filter, so there may be mismatches in species data if you include birds from multiple geopolitical areas on the same checklist, especially when those areas have considerably different habitats and birds.

These issues can be avoided by doing all of the following, in addition to the instructions above:
+ keep your checklists short in distance and duration
+ plot your location as precisely as possible
+ start a new checklist every time you cross a geopolitical boundary while traveling

These steps ensure your checklist is assigned to the correct eBird filter and summarized in the appropriate county, state, and country.
From eBird help article Birding Along Borders

Below is a list of locations in Ohio where the state line passes near an eBird hotspot.

Michigan State Line

Lucas County
Toledo Memorial Park
All of the developed section of Toledo Memorial Park, located north of Toledo, is in Ohio. The northern, undeveloped section of this cemetery is in Michigan. A hotspot has not been established for this northern section of the cemetery.

149th Street, Point Place
This hotspot is the northernmost location in Ohio on the Point Place peninsula. The northern tip of the peninsula is in Michigan. While there is an eBird hotspot in Michigan at the tip of the peninsula, Lost Peninsula, the road is a private, gated drive with access limited to residents and their guests.

Pennsylvania State Line

Ashtabula County
Pymatuning State Park
The Pymatuning Reservoir is on the Ohio-Pennsylvania border and is served by a state park in each state. For the convenience of birders, the hotspots in both states are referenced on the page link above.

The Ohio River forms the Ohio border with two states, West Virginia and Kentucky.

Since the late 1700s, various states have claimed ownership of various stretches of the Ohio River. The principal reason was to garner wealth from the trade that occurred on the river. In 1792, the federal government determined that Kentucky owned the Ohio River along its border with Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. In essence, the boundary between Kentucky and these three future states would be the low point of the Ohio River’s northernmost bank.

Both Indiana and Ohio have sought to claim the Ohio River, despite the federal government’s declaration in 1792. In 1966, Ohio claimed that the Ohio River’s course had fluctuated since 1792, so that the low point of the Ohio River’s northernmost bank in 1792 actually would be near the south bank of the river today. Ohio asked the United States Supreme Court to give ownership of the river to Ohio or, at the bare minimum, to set the boundary between Kentucky and Ohio in the midpoint of the Ohio River. The Supreme Court ruled that Kentucky had legal ownership to the Ohio River.
From Ohio History Central

The area of the Ohio River that borders West Virginia, and the islands that located within it, are wholly owned by West Virginia, the deed of cession of the Northwest Territory fixing the low water mark on the Ohio side as the western boundary of (what was then) Virginia. More than 30 West Virginia communities extend along the river.
From The West Virginia Encyclopedia

Because of these ownership concerns, in most places the state line is very near the Ohio side of the river and birds seen out in the river are not physically in Ohio. eBird allows birders to decide which birds “count” for their state list and, as indicated above, it is permissible in eBird to record all the birds you can observe from a location. The Ohio Bird Record Committee and Ohio eBird reviewers, on the other hand, usually want the bird to be physically located in the state. Birders who report rare bird sightings or unusually high counts may want to keep this in mind as they prepare eBird checklists.

The counties below are listed from north to south along the Ohio River.

West Virginia State Line

While there are many hotspots on the Ohio side of the river along the West Virginia border, there are just a few where there are hotspots established on both sides of the river.

Columbiana County
Broadway Wharf

Jefferson County
New Cumberland Locks and Dam
Rayland Marina (Jefferson Co.)

Belmont County
Pike Island Lock and Dam
The Ohio-West Virginia border is near the Ohio side of the Ohio River at this location. There are separate hotspots in West Virginia for reporting birds seen in the river pool or at the Pike Island Dam.

Monroe County
Hannibal Dam
The locks at the Hannibal Dam are on the Ohio side of the river and the state line runs along the middle of the locks area. There is a hotspot on the West Virginia side of the river.
Fly-Sistersville Ferry
The state line is 20-40 yards out in the river from the Ohio shoreline. If you take the ferry to Sisterville you cross the state line at the beginning of the crossing. There is currently no hotspot in West Virginia.
Fly Rest Area

Washington County
Willow Island Lock and Dam (Ohio)
Ohio Riverfront Park, Marietta
Gunlock Park
Civitan Park

Meigs County
Ohio River Lock and Dam 23
Belleville Locks and Dam
There are hotspots on each side of the river for the Belleville Locks and Dam.
Forked Run SP–Ohio River Access
Shade River Bridge @ OH-124

Gallia County
Gavin Power Plant
Kyger Creek Power Plant
Gallipolis Riverfront
Gallipolis Locks and Dam
There are hotspots on each side of the river for the Gallipolis Locks and Dam.

Kentucky State Line

Scioto County
Moores Lane
Shawnee SP–Marina

Brown County
Brown County Water Improvement District

Clermont County
Chilo Lock 34 Park
Meldahl Dam
There are hotspots on each side of the river for the Meldahl Locks and Dam.
New Richmond Riverfront

Hamilton County
Four Seasons Marina
Saint Rose Church River View
Theodore M. Berry Park
Smale Riverfront Park
Fernbank Park

Indiana State Line

At this time, there are no hotspots established along the Ohio-Indiana border.

Focus on Birding near a County Line

Please remember that multi-county checklists are not possible in eBird. The birds you report are assigned to the county in which the hotspot is located.

In Ohio, there are a surprising number of parks, wildlife areas, trails, and a National Park which are located on a county line. If you carefully keep your bird records by county, it is helpful to know where the county line is located so that the birds will be assigned to the proper county.

eBirding along County, State, and Country borders

In eBird, every complete checklist should be thought of as an attempt to record everything that you can detect from where you are standing or walking. If you are standing along the banks of a river you should certainly scan the river and both of its banks. If you are along a ridgetop, you should be counting birds that you can see in all directions. However, at times there may be a geopolitical border that bisects your walking path or your field of view. Birds never have cared much about geopolitics and in many cases they freely cross borders. What is the best way to do your eBirding in cases like this?

When it comes to the position of the birder and the position of the bird, listing rules can be inconsistent. For example, the preference in Ohio is to only count birds that have demonstrably occurred within the state or county boundaries. However, most yard lists count whatever bird can be seen from your yard. eBird best practices strive to bring more consistency to lists.

Example of a popular location with a county line.

How to report checklists near a state or county line in Ohio

Ohio eBird reviewers ask that birders keep precise state and county lists. When you are at a location where you see birds across a state or county line, we ask that you keep two incomplete birding lists, one for each side of the border.

When keeping separate checklists for different sides of a border, please follow these rules:
+ For both checklists, the answer to “Is this a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?” must be “No“, because each list intentionally omits birds in the other geopolitical area.
+ Use your exact location for birds detected on your side of the border; create a personal location directly across from you on the opposite side of the border for the birds you detect on that side. (You can also select an appropriate hotspot for either side of the border, but only if it accurately describes your location on your side or the general vicinity of the birds on the other side.)
+ If you freely crossed back and forth across the border while birding, choose an incomplete Stationary or Traveling protocol for both checklists. If you could not freely cross the border while birding, use the “Incidental” protocol for the checklist on the inaccessible side. Do not use the Stationary or Traveling protocol for any lists plotted to counties, states, or provinces you did not actually bird within.
+ We recommend focusing on one side of the border at a time instead of trying to keep two lists at once (you will not be able to keep simultaneous lists running on eBird Mobile if you are using tracks).

eBird best practices

Continue to follow eBird best practices; submit complete checklists that are short in duration and distance.
+ At eBird, complete checklists come first. Complete checklists are an attempt to record everything you can see or hear from your location. We do not want birds left off your list simply because they were across an (often invisible) geopolitical boundary. If you do leave birds off for this reason, it is no longer a complete checklist!

When traveling somewhere, begin a new checklist every time you cross a border.
+ This ensures the expected species list on eBird Mobile is up to date, and any new birds you detect are placed in your current county, state, and country instead of the previous one.

Every bird seen or heard from your location “counts”, regardless of where the bird is.
+ A complete checklist includes birds on both sides of the border. If you are standing on the Texas side of the US-Mexico border, and you see a Lineated Woodpecker flying on the Mexico side, report it! In eBird, this observation “counts” for where you are standing (i.e., your US and Texas lists). In Ohio, we ask that you use two incomplete checklists in these circumstances so that birds are assigned to the correct state and county.

Plot your location as accurately and precisely as possible.
+ For complete checklists, always plot your checklist where you were, not where the birds were. Do not place a complete checklist anywhere you did not stand or travel during that list.
+ Your data will be summarized to a single county, state, and country based on where you plot your checklist – so be precise! Avoid using hotspots if they do not accurately represent your location for the entire checklist.

Any time you see or hear a rare bird across a border, add some notes in the Species Comments about the bird’s location.
+ From the example above: because Lineated Woodpecker does not have a confirmed record within the United States, if you see or hear one in Mexico while you are on the Texas side of the border, you would certainly be asked to provide notes about this rare observation. Write detailed comments to help other birders understand the exact location of the bird relative to your own. This is especially helpful for those that might use the data, including journals and Bird Record Committees

Geopolitical units give us a way to organize and summarize eBird observations. Any birds you report on a checklist, regardless of where or how far you travel, will be automatically assigned to a county (where applicable), state/province, and country based on where you plot your list.

In most cases, this also determines the data entry checklist and data quality filter. Your checklist can only use one eBird filter, so there may be mismatches in species data if you include birds from multiple geopolitical areas on the same checklist, especially when those areas have considerably different habitats and birds.

These issues can be avoided by doing all of the following, in addition to the instructions above:
+ keep your checklists short in distance and duration
+ plot your location as precisely as possible
+ start a new checklist every time you cross a geopolitical boundary while traveling

These steps ensure your checklist is assigned to the correct eBird filter and summarized in the appropriate county, state, and country.
From eBird help article Birding Along Borders

Locations in Ohio where the county line passes through the area

Carroll-Tuscarawas
Atwood Lake
Atwood Lake Park

Franklin-Fairfield County
Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park
Blacklick Creek Greenway Trail
Blacklick Woods Metro Park

Mahoning-Portage-Stark
Berlin Lake

Brown-Clermont
Bott Wildlife Area

Adams-Scioto
Brush Creek State Forest

Fairfield-Licking
Buckeye Lake State Park

Athens-Morgan
Burr Oak State Park

Clinton-Greene
Caesar Creek Lake Wildlife Area

Clinton-Warren
Caesar Creek State Park

Franklin-Madison
Camp Chase Trail

Ashland-Richland
Charles Mill Lake

Fairfield-Hocking
Clear Creek Metro Park

Morrow-Richland
Clear Fork Reservoir

Gallia-Lawrence
Crown City Wildlife Area

Cuyahoga-Summit
Cuyahoga Valley National Park

Fayette-Pickaway
Deer Creek Wildlife Area

Delaware-Marion-Morrow
Delaware Wildlife Area

Licking-Muskingum
Dillon Wildlife Area

Butler-Hamilton
Fernald Preserve

Auglaize-Mercer
Grand Lake Saint Marys State Park

Butler-Miami-Montgomery
Great Miami River Trail

Lake-Geauga
Holden Arboretum

Delaware-Franklin
Hoover Reservoir

Butler-Preble
Hueston Woods State Park

Holmes-Wayne
Killbuck Marsh Wildlife Area

Marion-Wyandot
Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area

Jackson-Vinton
Lake Alma State Park

Lucas-Ottawa
Magee Marsh Wildlife Area
Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge

Fulton-Henry-Lucas
Maumee State Forest

Butler-Hamilton
Mill Creek

Coshocton-Knox
Mohican River Wildlife Area

Coshocton-Morgan-Muskingum-Washington
Muskingum River State Park

Cuyahoga-Lake
North Chagrin Reservation

Huron-Lorain-Sandusky
North Coast Inland Trail

Cuyahoga-Stark-Summit-Tuscarawas
Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath Trail

Highland-Ross
Paint Creek Lake Wildlife Area
Paint Creek State Park

Fayette-Ross
Paint Creek Recreational Trail

Franklin-Fairfield
Pickerington Ponds Metro Park

Belmont-Guernsey-Harrison
Piedmont Lake

Ashland-Richland
Pleasant Hill Lake

Champaign-Union
Pottersburg Bridge Trail

Franklin-Madison
Prairie Oaks Metro Park

Fairfield-Perry
Rush Creek Lake

Adams-Scioto
Shawnee State Forest

Stark-Wayne
Sippo Valley Trail

Greene-Warren
Spring Valley Wildlife Area

Gallia-Lawrence
Symmes Creek

Hocking-Ross-Vinton
Tar Hollow State Forest

Hocking-Ross
Tar Hollow State Park

Fulton-Henry-Lucas
Wabash Cannonball Trail

Portage-Stark
Walborn Reservoir

Ashtabula-Trumbull
Western Reserve Greenway Trail

What’s New–February 13, 2021

What’s New in Birding in Ohio

There are 3865 eBird hotspots in Ohio.

New eBird Hotspots

Medina County
Garden Isle Road
Garden Isle Road runs from the south edge of the village of Lodi to Willow Road near the I-71 and OH-83 interchange. The road traverses privately owned properties. Please view birds from the roadside only.

Miami County
Great Miami River Trail–OH-202 Trailhead
The Great Miami River Trail runs for 75 miles and hugs the Great Miami River nearly the entire route. The trail offers 32 miles of bikeway along the Great Miami River through Miami County.

Tuscarawas County
stakeout Painted Bunting, 1526 Gotthard St., Sugarcreek (2021)
A local birder has confirmed and secured permission for visitors to see a male Painted Bunting in Tuscarawas that the homeowners say has been present several weeks and continues today. Houses are close together here with very short driveways so parking will need to be on the street. Today Ed Schlabach spoke with the Sugar Creek Police Department who were very cooperative asking that we be very careful not to block traffic or driveways. The bird is visiting the back yard and feeder at 1526 Gotthard Street SW, Sugar Creek. Birders are invited to park on the road and only view from the driveway of either 1526 or 1532 Gotthard. Both homeowners have granted permission to view from those driveways but do not wander off the driveways, please. It sounds like the driveway of 1532 will actually give the best viewing even though the feeder is at 1526. If parking along the road should happen to fill up, there is public parking .3 miles away at a ball park at the end of Rhine St. Lastly please sign the visitor book on the porch of 1526. Thanks for enjoying this special visitor respectfully.
From Bobolink Area Facebook group
Thanks to Eli Miller for suggesting the stakeout hotspot.

Updates

We have updated the Focus on… articles about birding near a county or state line with help from Ohio eBird reviewers about how to report checklists in these situations.
Focus on Birding near a County Line
Focus on Birding near a State Line

How to report checklists near a state or county line in Ohio

Ohio eBird reviewers ask that birders keep precise state and county lists. When you are at a location where you see birds across a state or county line, we ask that you keep two incomplete birding lists, one for each side of the border.

When keeping separate checklists for different sides of a border, please follow these rules:
+ For both checklists, the answer to “Is this a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?” must be “No“, because each list intentionally omits birds in the other geopolitical area.
+ Use your exact location for birds detected on your side of the border; create a personal location directly across from you on the opposite side of the border for the birds you detect on that side. (You can also select an appropriate hotspot for either side of the border, but only if it accurately describes your location on your side or the general vicinity of the birds on the other side.)
+ If you freely crossed back and forth across the border while birding, choose an incomplete Stationary or Traveling protocol for both checklists. If you could not freely cross the border while birding, use the “Incidental” protocol for the checklist on the inaccessible side. Do not use the Stationary or Traveling protocol for any lists plotted to counties, states, or provinces you did not actually bird within.
+ We recommend focusing on one side of the border at a time instead of trying to keep two lists at once (you will not be able to keep simultaneous lists running on eBird Mobile if you are using tracks).

Belmont County
Pike Island Lock and Dam
At this location, the Ohio-West Virginia state line is on the bank of the Ohio side of the river. Birds seen on the Ohio River are in West Virginia in the Pike Island Pool (above the dam) or in the water below the dam (use the Pike Island Dam hotspot in West Virginia). When reporting birds from the Ohio hotspot use multiple incomplete checklists as described above.

 

 

 

Example of a popular location with a county line.

Pike Island Lock and Dam on the Ohio-West Virginia state line.

What’s New–February 6, 2021

What’s New in Birding in Ohio

There are 3862 eBird hotspots in Ohio.

New eBird Hotspots

Highlands Nature Sanctuary

Butler County
FurField Dog Park
Thanks to Brian Wulker for suggesting this hotspot. This park provides views of birds on Martin Marietta’s quarry lake.
Joyce Park
Thanks to Marianne Gorman for suggesting this hotspot and for providing tips for birding.

Franklin County
Schiller Park
Union Cemetery, Columbus–East
Webster Park
Whetstone Park–Columbus Park of Roses
Thanks to Angelika Nelson for suggesting these four hotspots.

Highland County
Highlands Nature Sanctuary–Barretts Rim Trail
Highlands Nature Sanctuary–Barrier Ridge Trail
Highlands Nature Sanctuary–Cedar Run Trail
Highlands Nature Sanctuary–Kamelands Trail
Highlands Nature Sanctuary–Listening Trail
Highlands Nature Sanctuary–Maudes Cedar Narrows Trail
Highlands Nature Sanctuary–Museum Trails
Highlands Nature Sanctuary–Ridgeview Farm and Trail
Highlands Nature Sanctuary–Roundtop Loop
Thanks to Brian Wulker for suggesting these hotspots on trails in the Highlands Nature Sanctuary. Please use these more specific locations when you submit checklists on these trails.

Rocky Fork State Park–Fishing Wharf
Rocky Fork State Park–North Beach Marina
Thanks to Brian Wulker for suggesting these additional hotspots at Rocky Fork State Park.

Updates

Added a page listing Ohio Counties by Region.

Butler County
Marsh Park Fishing Lake
Changed the name of this hotspot from “Marsh Lake” to match the name used on the park webpage and on Google maps.

Summit County
PPG Lime Lakes
Changed the name of this hotspot from “Barberton Salt Ponds, Lime Lakes” to reflect the restoration work done by PPG Industries on this former industrial site. Thanks to Dennis Mersky whose company worked on the project for suggesting this change and for providing information about it.

Thanks to Tom Fishburn for providing photos for hotspots in several counties.
Cedar Bog State Nature Preserve
Highlands Nature Sanctuary–Barretts Rim Trail
Highlands Nature Sanctuary–Listening Trail
Highlands Nature Sanctuary–Museum Trails
Highlands Nature Sanctuary–Ridgeview Farm and Trail
Lawrence Woods State Nature Preserve
McCracken Fen State Nature Preserve
Milford Center Prairie State Natural Area
Myeerah Nature Preserve
Myeerah Nature Preserve–Wetland
Wayne National Forest–Big Bailey Wetland

What’s New–January 30, 2021

What’s New in Birding in Ohio

There are 3845 eBird hotspots in Ohio.

Tips for Birding in Ohio

Winter Birding at Killdeer Plains

January and February winter birding at Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area can be a true adventure. Winter specialties, such as Northern Harriers, Rough-legged Hawks, Long- and Short-eared Owls, Lapland Longspurs, and Snow Buntings are often found in the area. Birders drive the area, birding much of the time from their vehicles, but exiting frequently to scan promising fields and walk in the woods. Sunset is early, 5:45 to 6:00 pm, depending when in the winter you go; starting a little before that, look for Short-eared Owls hunting over the fields.

Check the pages on Killdeer Plains in this website:
Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area
There are 17 eBird hotspots at Killdeer Plains and you will find a page of information on each of them, complete with maps and tips for birding.
Killdeer Plains Birding Drive
This birding drive suggests one way to drive through the wildlife area visiting 8 hotspots.

For reports on past trips check Jim McCarty’s article from the Cleveland Plain Dealer or the report of a trip by the Columbus Audubon Society.

When you go, dress warmly. Plan to stay to see the owls fly. Winter birding in Ohio is a great adventure.

New eBird Hotspots

Franklin County
Groveport Municipal Golf Course
Thanks to James Muller for suggesting this hotspot.

Walnut Woods Metro Park–Big Run Area
Walnut Woods Metro Park–Buckeye Area
Walnut Woods Metro Park–Tall Pines Area
Walnut Woods Metro Park–Walnut Creek Fields
Thanks to James Muller for suggesting these additional hotspots within the Walnut Woods Metro Park and for providing tips for birding the Walnut Creek Fields. We have also added this Walnut Woods to the Ohio Birding Day Hikes index.

Greene County
Dominick Lofino Park
Thanks to Ryan Taylor for suggesting this hotspot.

Prairie Grass Trail–Cedarville
Thanks to Lee Funderburg for suggesting this hotspot.

Muskingum County
Joes Run Recreational Trail
Thanks to Chris Crook for suggesting this hotspot and for providing a photo and tips for birding.

Ottawa County
Union Cemetery, Oak Harbor
Thanks to Ryan Lesniewicz for suggesting this hotspot.

Washington County
Muskingum River Road
Thanks to Michael Schramm for suggesting this hotspot and for providing tips for birding.

Updates

Revised help tip
How to get a “life list” of birds seen at a personal location

Hancock County
Litzenberg Memorial Woods
Litzenberg Memorial Woods–North of US-224
Litzenberg Memorial Woods–South of US-224
Added “US-224” to the hotspot names of the two sections of Litzenberg Memorial Woods. The use of directional labels in hotspot names can be confusing to birders who may not know an area. North of what? Or South of what?

Franklin County
Union Cemetery, Columbus–East
Added “Columbus” to the name of this hotspot to distinguish it from other Union Cemeteries in Ohio. Added a map.

What’s New–January 23, 2021

What’s New in Birding in Ohio

There are 3835 eBird hotspots in Ohio.

New eBird Hotspots

Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge – Stange Prairie
Muskingum County
Mission Oaks Gardens
Thanks to Taylor Shimek for suggesting this hotspot in Zanesville and for providing tips for birding.

Franklin County
Minerva Park Lake and Greenbelt
Thanks to Rob Thorn for suggesting this hotspot and for providing photos and tips for birding.

Ottawa County
Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge–Stange Prairie
The Stange Prairie has an observation deck that may be accessed from Stange Road. It provides views of the pond on the Wildlife Drive.

The hotspot Stange Rd. @ Krause Rd. has been adjusted accordingly. These roads are on the edge of the National Wildlife Area and birders use it to report birds seen in the agricultural fields on private lands along the roads.

Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge–Two Rivers Unit, O’Neal Road (restricted access)
Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge–Two Rivers Unit, West Portage River South Road

Thanks to Trevor Zook for suggesting hotspots for a newly opened unit of Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge near the confluence of the Portage and Little Portage rivers.

Updates

Clark County
Eagle City Rd. Borrow Pits (view from roadside only)
The Eagle City Road Borrow Pits are not open to entry. We have added (view from roadside only) to this hotspot name.

Cuyahoga County
Lakefront Reservation–Scranton Road Peninsula
Thanks to Tom Fishburn for providing photos.

Geauga County
South Russell Village Park
Thanks to Matt Valencic for providing tips and updated information about this park.

Ottawa County
Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge–Little Portage Unit
Changed the name of “Little Portage River–Upper” to reflect that this has become a unit of the Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge.

Scranton Flats
Scranton Flats, Photo by Tom Fishburn